John Yamrus – “this chair”

Since 1970 John Yamrus has published 2 novels and 25 volumes of poetry. He has also had more than 1,800 poems published in print magazines around the world. His work is taught in a number of colleges and universities.

this chair

where i sit
and write my poems
is beat up and scratched,
held together with wire, tape and hope.

you figure it out.

————————————————————-

*Editor’s note

The symbolic art of “less is more” can be a tricky device. To truly achieve this the reader must be primed for the intellectual indulgence. The poem as a whole must be an universal metaphor. The parts which make the whole build understanding, like deciphering the layers of a particular rich but bite sized piece of delicious pastry. Probably the most famous of these types of poems is “The Red Wheelbarrow” by William Carlos Williams. Volumes of analysis have been written on this Imagist little gem, each analysis as germane and valid as the next, but with an overall consensus that the poem delivers a powerful statement on the nature of existence and the human condition.

Likewise, John Yamrus’ poem here, delivers an exclamation mark in clear concise language. The poem begins with a declaration of an object, “this chair.” Now, is the chair the subject, the title? The chair is declared. Then the reader is given the state of the chair and why. Of course, the state of the chair is also the state of the poet. Indeed, the state of all poets. The state of all poets who surrender to the discipline of symbols, objects, and image.

The last line is the wink and a nod. For you, dear readers, you will figure it out.

– Angel Uriel Perales, July 8th, 2016

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About Rumrazor

Just a malcontent surviving in Los Angeles, working the news, writing the poetry, making the films.
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